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Frogs in Arkansas

24 Frogs & Toads Found in Arkansas (With Pictures)

Arkansas is home to 24+ different species of frogs and toads, making it a great place for amphibian enthusiasts.

The state’s amphibian population is most diverse in the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains, where you’ll find species like the American Green Tree Frog.

If you’re interested in finding frogs and toads in Arkansas, your best bet is to visit one of the state’s many parks or natural areas. Some good places to look include the Hot Springs National Park, the Buffalo National River, and the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s Frog Watch USA sites.

When visiting these areas, be sure to bring along a net and some rubber boots, as you’ll likely get wet!

American Toad

American Toad
Photo by: Jarek Tuszyński / Wikipedia (CC-BY-SA-4.0)

The American toad is one of the most common toads in North America. They are usually a light brown or tan color, and they can grow up to 3 inches long. The American toad is found throughout Arkansas, living in a variety of habitats including forests, meadows, and wetlands. These amphibians are mostly nocturnal, and

Fowler’s Toad

Fowler's Toad
Photo by: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters / Flickr (Public Domain)

The Fowler’s Toad is a medium-sized toad found in Arkansas. They are typically dark brown or black in color, with light markings on their backs and sides.

Woodhouse’s Toad

Woodhouse Toad
Photo by: J. N. Stuart / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Woodhouse’s Toad is a small, brown toad found in Arkansas. They are usually about 1.5 inches long and have a bumpy skin. Woodhouse’s Toads live in moist areas near ponds and streams, and can be found from late February to October.

Blanchard’s Cricket Frog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog
Photo by: Andrew DuBois / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

The Blanchard’s Cricket Frog is a small frog that ranges in color from light green to olive green. They have dark spots on their backs and sides, and their bellies are white or cream-colored.

They can be found throughout Arkansas in moist, wooded areas near ponds and streams. These frogs are mostly nocturnal, meaning they are most active at night, and they rely heavily on their hearing to find food and avoid predators.

Boreal Chorus Frog

Boreal Chorus Frog
Photo by: J. N. Stuart / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Boreal Chorus Frog is a small, green frog that can be found throughout Arkansas. They are usually about 1-2 inches long and have a dark stripe running down their backs. These frogs can be found in wooded areas near ponds and streams, and they often make their homes in the hollows of trees or under logs.

Illinois Chorus Frog

Illinois Chorus Frog
Photo by: Peter Paplanus / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Illinois Chorus Frog is a small, dark-colored frog with a wide mouth and a prominent ridge on the upper eyelid. They are found in Arkansas and other states in the southeastern United States.

Upland Chorus Frog

Upland Chorus Frog
Photo by: cotinis / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The Upland Chorus Frog is a small, brown frog that is found in the uplands of Arkansas. They are usually about 1.5 inches long and have a dark stripe down their back. They live in wet areas near ponds and streams, and can be found from late March to early October.

Spring Peeper

Spring Peeper
Photo by: Peter Paplanus / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Spring Peeper is a small tree frog that is found throughout Arkansas. They are usually a light green color, but can also be brown or gray. They have dark spots on their backs and are about 1-2 inches long. Spring Peepers live in trees and bushes near ponds and streams, and can be heard singing at night during the springtime.

Bird-voiced Treefrog

Bird-voiced Treefrog
Photo by: Greg Schechter / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Bird-voiced Treefrog is a medium-sized frog that ranges in color from green to brown. They have large eyes and are typically found near water, where they make their homes in trees. These frogs are named for the high-pitched sound they make to communicate with other members of their species.

Related: Frogs in Texas

Squirrel Tree Frog

Squirrel Tree Frog
Photo by: Northeast Coastal & Barrier Network / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

The squirrel tree frog is a small, green frog that is found throughout Arkansas. They get their name from the fact that they often climb trees in search of food. These frogs are not very big, typically measuring only about two inches in length.

They have smooth skin and pointed snouts, and their eyes are large and round. Squirrel tree frogs can be found near streams and ponds, where they spend most of their time hiding in the underbrush or leaping into the water to avoid predators.

Green Tree Frog

Green Tree Frog
Photo by: Greg Schechter / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The American Green Tree Frog is a small frog that ranges in color from light green to olive green. They have a white stripe down their back and are found in Arkansas. They live in trees and bushes near water sources and love to eat insects.

Gray Tree Frog

Gray Tree Frog
Photo by: James St. John / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Gray Tree Frog is a small, stocky frog that ranges in color from light green to gray. They are found throughout Arkansas and can be identified by their characteristic black eyes and vertical pupil. Gray Tree Frogs are mostly nocturnal and prefer to live in moist environments such as swamps, marshes, and woodlands.

Cope’s Gray Tree Frog

Cope's Gray Tree Frog
Photo by: Fredlyfish4 / Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The Cope’s Gray Tree Frog is a small frog that ranges in color from light gray to almost black. They have a white stripe down their back, and their underside is white as well. They are found throughout Arkansas, but prefer moist habitats near water. They are very good climbers, and can be found in trees and on leaves during the day. At night they come out to hunt for food.

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad
Photo by: William L. Farr / Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad is a small, dark-colored toad found in Arkansas. They have a slim body and a pointed snout, and they range in size from 1.5 to 2.5 inches long. Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toads are typically found near water, where they live among the aquatic plants and feed on insects and other invertebrates.

Southern Leopard Frog

Southern Leopard Frog
Photo by: Bob Warrick / Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The Southern Leopard Frog is a type of frog that can be found in Arkansas. They are usually a light green or brown color, and they have black spots on their backs and sides. They live near ponds, marshes, and other wetlands areas, and they eat insects, tadpoles, and other small creatures.

Crawfish Frog

Crawfish Frog
Photo by: Peter Paplanus / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Crawfish Frog is a small frog that ranges in color from light green to brown. They have a wide, flattened head and their eyes are set high on the sides of their heads. They are usually found near water, under logs and rocks, or in mud. Crawfish Frogs live in Arkansas and parts of Oklahoma.

Plains Leopard Frog

Plains Leopard Frog
Photo by: Andrew DuBois / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The Plains Leopard Frog is a species of frog that is found in Arkansas. They are brown or green in color, and have spots on their back and sides. They live near ponds and other bodies of water, and eat insects, spiders, and other small creatures.

American Bullfrog

American Bullfrog
Photo by: Katja Schulz / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The American Bullfrog is a species of frog that is native to the eastern United States and southeastern Canada. They are easily identified by their greenish-brown coloration and the black spots that dot their backs. They are typically found near water, in marshes, swamps, and ponds.

Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans)

Green Frog
Photo by: Judy Gallagher / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The green frog is a medium-sized frog that ranges in color from light green to olive or brown. They have a wide, flattened head and a stout body. Green frogs are found throughout Arkansas in ponds, marshes, and other wetlands. They are active during the day and can be seen perched on logs or rocks near the water’s edge.

Pickerel Frog

Pickerel Frog
Photo by: BlueRidgeKitties / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Pickerel Frogs are a common sight in Arkansas. They are usually found near ponds and slow-moving streams, but can also be found in marshes and other wet areas. These frogs get their name from their resemblance to the pickerel fish, which is also common in Arkansas waterways.

They’re easily recognized by their greenish-brown coloration and dark spots on their backs and sides. They have a white underside with black markings that run down the length of their bodies.

Wood Frog

Wood Frog
Photo by: The Cosmonaut / Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 2.5 CA)

The wood frog is a species of North American frog found in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada. The wood frog is brown or gray with dark spots and has a broad, white stripe running from its chin to its groin. This frog lives near ponds and other wetlands, typically in forests.

Hurter’s Spadefoot Toad

Hurter's Spadefoot Toad
Photo by: William L. Farr / Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The Hurter’s Spadefoot Toad is a small, brown toad with a distinctive spade-like projection on the underside of its hind feet. It ranges from central Arkansas to east Texas and south into Mexico. They are usually found in moist, sandy areas near ponds or streams.

Eastern Spadefoot Toad

Eastern Spadefoot Toad
Photo by: Aurelius787 / Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0)

The Eastern Spadefoot Toad is a small, brown toad found in Arkansas. They have a dark stripe down their back and a spade-like projection on their hind feet which they use for digging. They are most active at night and can be found near ponds and wetlands.

Plains Spadefoot Toad

Plains Spadefoot Toad
Photo by: Andrew DuBois / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

The Plains Spadefoot Toad is a small, dark amphibian that ranges in color from light tan to nearly black. They have a stout body and broad head, and their eyes are prominent. They are generally found near water, where they spend most of their time underground. In Arkansas, they can be found statewide.

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