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Frogs in Arizona

26 Frogs & Toads Found in Arizona (Pictures Included)

Did you know that Arizona is home to 26+ different types of frogs and toads? In addition to the well-known Western Toad, the state also boasts the Great Basin Spadefoot Toad, the Sonoran Desert Toad, and the Baja California Frog.

The climate and terrain in Arizona are unique and diverse. The state has a hot desert climate in the south, with cold winters in the mountains. The terrain ranges from mountains and plateaus to canyons and deserts. This variety of habitats supports a wide variety of wildlife, including different types of frogs and toads.

So, whether you live here or you’re visiting soon, be sure to keep your eyes open for the fascinating amphibians!

Great Plains Toad

Great Plains Toad
Great Plains Toad (Anaxyrus cognatus) Photo by: Galactor / Wikiepdia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The Great Plains Toad is a toad found in the state of Arizona. They have a smooth, olive-colored skin and are about 2-3 inches long. They are typically found near water sources such as ponds, marshes, and streams. They are also known to live in agricultural areas.

Green Toad

Green Toad
Green Toad (Anaxyrus debilis) Photo by: Скампецкий / Wikipedia (CC BY 3.0)

The Green Toad is a small, green toad that can be found in the state of Arizona. They are usually located near creeks and other bodies of water.

Arizona Toad

Arizona Toad
Arizona Toad (Anaxyrus microscaphus) Photo by: Jonathan Hakim / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

The Arizona Toad is a small, brown toad that can be found in the state of Arizona. They are usually about 2-3 inches long, and have a smooth, dry skin. They are generally found in open areas near water, such as fields, deserts, and canyons.

Red-spotted Toad

Red Spotted Toad
Red Spotted Toad (Anaxyrus punctatus) Photo by: Lon&Queta / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The Red-spotted Toad is a type of toad. They can be different colors, but they are mostly brown. They have red spots on their skin. They live in Arizona, mainly in the eastern part of the state.

Sonoran Green Toad

Sonoran Green Toad
Sonoran Green Toad (Bufo retiformis) Photo by: Josh More / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Sonoran Green Toad is a toad that lives in Arizona. It is green and can be found near water. It is a nocturnal creature that comes out at night to eat insects.

If you’re lucky enough to see a Sonoran Green Toad, you’ll be able to observe its fascinating behavior. This toad is most active at night, when it emerges from its hiding place to hunt for insects. It uses its long tongue to snag prey, which it then swallows whole. During the day, the Sonoran Green Toad rests in a cool, damp spot, such as a burrow or beneath a rock.

Woodhouse’s Toad

Woodhouse's Toad
Woodhouse’s Toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii) Photo by: J. N. Stuart / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Woodhouse’s Toad is a small, brown toad found in the deserts of Arizona. It has a smooth, leathery skin with wart-like bumps and a blunt snout. The Woodhouse’s Toad is common in the lowlands and foothills of the state.

Colorado River Toad

Colorado River Toad
Colorado River toad (Incilius alvarius) Photo by: kuhnmi / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Colorado River Toad is an amphibian found in the state of Arizona! They are typically a dark brown or green color and have a smooth skin. They are a relatively large toad, measuring up to 6 inches in length. They are found near water sources, such as ponds, rivers, and lakes. They feed on insects and other small prey.

Baja California Tree Frog

Baja California Tree Frog
Baja California Tree Frog (Pseudacris hypochondriaca) Photo by: Jonathan Coffin / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The Baja California Tree Frog is a species of frog that is found in the state of Arizona. They are a small frog, typically measuring around 2-3 inches in length. They have a light green or brown coloring and have a distinctive stripe that runs down their back. They are found in moist habitats, such as marshes, swamps, and forests. They feed on bugs and other small creatures.

Boreal Chorus Frog

Boreal Chorus Frog
Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata) Photo by: J. N. Stuart / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Boreal Chorus Frog is a small frog that is green or brown in color. They have a dark stripe down their back, and can be found near ponds and streams in the state of Arizona. These frogs are well camouflaged among the plants that grow nearby, making them difficult to see. They typically measure about 2 inches long, but can grow up to 3 inches in length.

Arizona Tree Frog

Arizona Tree Frog
Arizona Tree Frog (Dryophytes wrightorum) Photo by: Cataloging Nature / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Arizona tree frog is a small, green frog that can be found in many parts of the state of Arizona. They typically have a brownish-black stripe down their back, and they are approximately 2-3 inches in length. These frogs can be found near ponds, lakes, and other wetlands areas. They are well camouflaged among the trees and plants in their habitat, making them difficult to see.

Canyon Tree Frog

Canyon Tree Frog
Canyon Tree Frog (Dryophytes arenicolor) Photo by: Katja Schulz / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Canyon Tree Frog is a small, green frog that can be found in the canyons of Arizona. They are often mistaken for lizards because of their long, slender body and smooth skin. They have large eyes and a wide mouth, and they can grow up to 3 inches long. Canyon Tree Frogs live in moist environments and eat insects and other small animals.

Lowland Burrowing Tree Frog

Lowland Burrowing Tree Frog
Lowland Burrowing Tree Frog (Smilisca fodiens) Photo by: Jorge Armín Escalante Pasos / Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The Lowland Burrowing Tree Frog is a small, dark-colored frog found in the state of Arizona. It looks like a small, dark blob with big eyes and can be difficult to spot among the rocks and plants. These frogs are most commonly found near water, such as streams and rivers, but can also be found in moist areas near forests.

Mazatlan Narrow-mouthed Toad

Mazatlan Narrow-mouthed Toad
Mazatlan Narrow-mouthed Toad (Gastrophryne mazatlanensis) Photo by: David Bygott / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The Mazatlan Narrow-mouthed Toad is a small, brightly colored toad found in the state of Arizona. It has a narrow head and mouth, and a smooth, dark brown or black body. This toad is typically found near water, in moist areas such as gardens and meadows.

Chiricahua Leopard Frog

Chiricahua Leopard Frog
Chiricahua leopard frog (Lithobates chiricahuensis) Photo by: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Chiricahua Leopard Frog is a type of frog that is found in the state of Arizona. They are a medium-sized frog, and they have a greenish-brown coloration with black spots on their back. They also have a white stripe that runs down the center of their head and body. They are a common sight in the Chiricahua Mountains and the surrounding area.

Rio Grande Leopard Frog

Rio Grande Leopard Frog
Rio Grande Leopard Frog (Lithobates berlandieri) Photo by: az3 / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Rio Grande Leopard Frog is a species of frog that is found in the state of Arizona. They are easily identifiable by their green and brown coloring, as well as their leopard-like spots. They can be found near bodies of water, such as rivers and lakes.

Plains Leopard Frog

Plains Leopard Frog
Plains Leopard Frog (Lithobates blairi) Photo by: Andrew DuBois / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The Plains Leopard Frog is a medium-sized frog that has a wide range of colors. They can be green, brown, yellow, or white and have dark markings on their backs and legs. They are found in the eastern part of Arizona and are most common in the prairies and grasslands.

Related: Frogs and Toads in Texas

American Bullfrog

American Bullfrog
American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) Photo by: Katja Schulz / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The American Bullfrog is a large, green frog that can be found throughout the state of Arizona. They are easily identifiable by their smooth skin and protruding tympani, or eardrums. These frogs are aquatic and prefer to live in marshes, swamps, and other wet habitats. They are herbivores and feed mainly on insects, small fish, and other invertebrates.

Relict Leopard Frog

Relict Leopard Frog
Relict Leopard Frog (Lithobates onca) Photo by: Renee Grayson / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Relict Leopard Frog is a species of frog that can be found in the state of Arizona. These frogs are relatively small, measuring only about 2-3 inches in length, and they have a very distinctive appearance. They are pale green or yellow in color, with bold black markings on their back and sides. They also have a distinctive “mask” pattern on their face, which is dark brown or black.

Relict Leopard Frogs are typically found near water sources, such as ponds, lakes, and streams. They are a reclusive species, and are rarely seen by humans. They feed on insects and other small invertebrates.

Northern Leopard Frog

Northern Leopard Frog
Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) Photo by: Ryan Hodnett / Flickr (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The Northern Leopard Frog is a large frog that ranges in color from light green to brown or gray. They have dark spots or blotches on their skin which give them their name. They are found throughout the state of Arizona.

Tarahumara Frog

Tarahumara Frog
Tarahumara Frog (Lithobates tarahumarae) Photo by: USFWS Endangered Species / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Tarahumara Frog is a small frog that can be found in the state of Arizona. They are usually a light green or brown color, and they have a smooth skin. They get their name from the Tarahumara people who live in the Chihuahua Desert, where these frogs live.

Lowland Leopard Frog

Lowland Leopard Frog
Lowland Leopard Frog (Rana yavapaiensis) Photo by: Patrick Dockens / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Lowland Leopard Frog is a species of frog that is found in the state of Arizona. They are a medium-sized frog, and they have a greenish-brown coloration with black spots on their back. They are typically found near water sources, such as ponds, lakes, and streams.

Couch’s Spadefoot Toad

Couch's Spadefoot Toad
Couch’s spadefoot (Scaphiopus couchi) Photo by: California Department of Fish and Wildlife / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Couch’s Spadefoot Toad is a small, brown toad that can be found in the state of Arizona. They typically have a smooth, dark skin and are about 1-2 inches long. These toads can be found near bodies of water, such as ponds and lakes, and are often seen hopping among the grasses and plants. They are active during the day and tend to avoid direct sunlight.

Mexican Spadefoot Toad

Mexico Spadefoot Toad
Mexico Spadefoot Toad (Spea multiplicata) Photo by: Andrew DuBois / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

The Mexican Spadefoot Toad is a small amphibian that has a dark brown or black body with a light-colored stripe down its back. It is typically about 2-3 inches long, and its eyes are prominent. The Mexican Spadefoot Toad is found in the southwestern United States, including Arizona.

In Arizona, they are found in the Chihuahuan, Sonoran, and Mojave Deserts. They live in sandy areas near rivers and lakes, and they feed on insects and other small invertebrates.

Plains Spadefoot Toad

Plains Spadefoot Toad
Plains Spadefoot Toad (Spea bombifrons) Photo by: Andrew DuBois / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

The Plains Spadefoot Toad is a small, dark-colored toad that has a spade-like projection on its hind foot. It is found in the eastern part of Arizona. These toads are usually found near water, such as ponds, marshes, and streams.

Great Basin Spadefoot Toad

Great Basin Spadefoot Toad
Great Basin Spadefoot Toad (Great Basin Spadefoot Toad) Photo by: Kerry Matz / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The Great Basin Spadefoot Toad is a species of toad that is found in the state of Arizona. They are a small toad, typically measuring between 2 and 3 inches in length. They are characterized by their spade-like projections on their hind feet, which gives them their name.

They are usually a light brown or green in color, and they have prominent black markings on their backs. Great Basin Spadefoot Toads live in desert environments, and can be found in areas such as the Chihuahuan Desert and the Sonoran Desert.

Rio Grande Chirping Frog

Rio Grande Chirping Frog
Rio Grande chirping frog (Eleutherodactylus cystignathoides) Photo by: William L. Farr / Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

This is an olive-colored frog found in the state of Arizona. They are typically about two inches in length, and have a dark mask that extends from their eye to their mouth. Rio Grande Chirping Frogs are known for their distinct chirping noise, which they use to communicate with one another.

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