FrogPets is reader-supported. We may earn a commission if you buy through the links on our site.

Frogs in New Mexico

18 Frogs & Toads Found in New Mexico (With Pictures)

In the state of New Mexico, there are 18+ frogs and toads that have been identified. These amphibians can be found in various areas of the state, including the mountainous regions and near bodies of water.

The climate of New Mexico is dry and hot, with temperatures reaching up to 100 degrees Fahrenheit in the summer. The terrain is mostly mountainous, with a few areas near the Rio Grande that are relatively flat.

So, whether you live here or you’re visiting in the near future, here are 18 frogs and toads found in New Mexico!

Western Toad

Western Toad
Photo by: Oregon State University / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

The Wester Toad is a small, brown amphibian that can be found throughout New Mexico. They are usually about 2-3 inches in length and have bumpy, dry body. Wester Toads prefer to live in moist environments near creeks and ponds, but can also be found in woodlands and fields. They are most active at night and

Great Plains Toad

Great Plains Toad
Photo by: Galactor / Wikiepdia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The Great Plains Toad is a species of toad found in the Great Plains of the United States and in eastern Mexico. They are brown or gray with dark spots and measure 2.5 to 5 inches (6.4 to 12.7 cm) in length. They live in moist grasslands, savannas, and open woodlands near ponds, lakes, and slow-moving streams.

Green Toad

Green Toad
Photo by: Скампецкий / Wikipedia (CC BY 3.0)

The green toad is a small, delicate creature that can be found throughout the state of New Mexico. They are typically a light olive green in color, with darker spots scattered across their backs and sides. They have dry, bumpy skin, and tend to prefer habitats with plenty of moisture such as marshes, ponds, and streams. Green toads are nocturnal creatures, and during the day they can often be found hiding under logs or rocks.

Arizona Toad

Arizona Toad
Photo by: Jonathan Hakim / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

The Arizona toad is a small, brown toad with a distinctive orange stripe down its back. It is found in the southwestern United States, and particularly in New Mexico.

Red-spotted Toad

Red Spotted Toad
Photo by: Lon&Queta / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The Red-spotted toad is a small, dark amphibian that ranges in color from olive green to black. They have red spots on their backs and are usually found near water in the southwestern United States. In New Mexico, they can be found in the Chihuahuan Desert and along the Rio Grande.

Texas Toad

Texas Toad
Photo by: William L. Farr / Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The Texas Toad is a species of toad that is found in New Mexico. They are the largest toads in the United States, and can reach up to 6 inches in length. They are generally a brown or black color, with some lighter markings on their skin. They live in a variety of habitats, including forests, deserts, and grasslands.

Woodhouse Toad

Woodhouse Toad
Photo by: J. N. Stuart / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Woodhouse Toad is a large, stocky toad that ranges in color from olive green to gray. They have a light stripe down the middle of their back, and are covered in warts. They are found throughout New Mexico, living in a variety of habitats including forests, grasslands, and urban areas. Woodhouse Toads eat insects and other small invertebrates.

Sonoran Desert Toad (Colorado River Toad)

Colorado River Toad
Photo by: kuhnmi / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Colorado River Toad is a large, brown toad found in the southwestern United States. They are typically 8-10 inches long and can weigh up to 2 pounds. The Colorado River Toad is a nocturnal animal and feeds on insects, spiders, and small rodents. They live in moist areas near rivers and streams.

Blanchard’s Cricket Frog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog
Photo by: Andrew DuBois / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

The Blanchard’s Cricket Frog is a small, green frog found in New Mexico. They are about 2 inches long and have a wide head and body. They are usually seen near water, hopping along the ground or hiding under leaves. These frogs eat insects and spiders, and can live for up to 5 years.

Boreal Chorus Frog

Boreal Chorus Frog
Photo by: J. N. Stuart / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Boreal Chorus Frog is a small, slimy amphibian that can be found throughout much of New Mexico. These frogs are typically less than two inches in length, and are characterized by their olive green or brown coloring and their distinctive black stripe down the center of their backs. Boreal Chorus Frogs live in moist environments near ponds, streams, and other bodies of water, where they feed on a variety of insects.

Arizona Tree Frog

Arizona Tree Frog
Photo by: Cataloging Nature / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Arizona tree frog is a type of green tree frog that ranges in color from light green to olive green. They have a white stripe down their back and are about 2-3 inches long. The Arizona tree frog can be found in New Mexico, where they live in trees and shrubs near water. They are active during the day and feed on small insects.

Canyon Tree Frog

Canyon Tree Frog
Photo by: Katja Schulz / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Canyon Tree Frog is a small frog found in the Chihuahuan Desert of New Mexico. They are green or brown with dark markings and can grow up to 2 inches long. These frogs live in trees and bushes near streams and are active mostly at night. They eat insects, spiders, and other small invertebrates.

Chiricahua Leopard Frog

Chiricahua Leopard Frog
Photo by: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Chiricahua Leopard Frog is a medium to large sized frog found in the Chihuahuan Desert of southeastern New Mexico. These frogs can reach up to 3.5 inches in length and are typically a light green or gray color with dark spots or blotches on their back and sides. They have a white stripe down their spine and a pale stripe along each side.

These frogs are typically found near permanent water sources such as streams, rivers, and ponds, but can also be found in moist meadows, grasslands, and woodlands.

Rio Grande Leopard Frog

Rio Grande Leopard Frog
Photo by: az3 / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Rio Grande Leopard Frog is a species of frog found in the U.S. states of Texas and New Mexico. They are medium-sized frogs, measuring around 2 to 3 inches in length, and are characterized by their leopard-like spots. They inhabit marshes, ponds, and other wetlands areas. Rio Grande Leopard Frogs are preyed upon by a variety of predators, including snakes, birds, and mammals.

Plains Leopard Frog

Plains Leopard Frog
Photo by: Andrew DuBois / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The Plains Leopard Frog is a small frog, typically measuring about two inches in length. They have a light brown or green body with dark spots and stripes, and their underparts are white or cream-colored. They are found throughout much of New Mexico, living in open areas near water such as ponds, marshes, and streams.

American Bullfrog

American Bullfrog
Photo by: Katja Schulz / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The American Bullfrog is a large frog that can be found in many parts of the United States, including New Mexico. Adult bullfrogs can grow to be up to eight inches long and they have a greenish-brown color with some light spots.

They are often seen near water, where they like to hunt for food. Bullfrogs are not considered endangered or threatened, but they are important members of their ecosystems.

Lowland Leopard Frog

Lowland Leopard Frog
Photo by: Patrick Dockens / Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Lowland Leopard Frog is a species of frog that ranges in size from 2.5 to 5 inches long, making it one of the smaller leopard frogs. They are generally green or brown in color, with black spots or stripes on their back and sides.

They can be found throughout New Mexico, living near ponds, lakes, and slow-moving streams. Lowland Leopard Frogs are mostly nocturnal, and during the day they can often be found hiding under rocks or logs near the water’s edge.

Couch’s Spadefoot Toad

Couch's Spadefoot Toad
Photo by: California Department of Fish and Wildlife / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Couch’s Spadefoot Toad is a type of toad that is found in New Mexico. They are generally about 2-3 inches long and have a mottled brown and black coloring. They live in sandy areas near water and can be seen emerging from the soil after a rainstorm.

Mexican Spadefoot Toad

Mexican Spadefoot Frog
Photo by: Andrew DuBois / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

The Mexican Spadefoot Toad is a small, dark amphibian that ranges in size from 1.5 to 2.5 inches long. They are typically black or dark brown in color, with a distinctive spade-shaped marking on their hind feet.

These toads are found in New Mexico, where they live in arid and semiarid habitats such as scrublands and deserts. Mexican Spadefoot Toads are mostly nocturnal animals, and spend the day buried underground in animal burrows or beneath rocks. At night they come out to hunt for insects.

Related: What Do Toads Eat?

Plains Spadefoot Toad

Plains Spadefoot Toad
Photo by: Andrew DuBois / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

The Plains Spadefoot Toad is a small, gray toad found in the Great Plains of the United States and in the Chihuahuan Desert of Mexico. They are about two inches long and have a spade-like projection on their hind feet which they use for digging. They are nocturnal and spend most of the day buried in soil or under debris. They eat insects, spiders, and other small invertebrates.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *