Fire-Bellied Toad

Do Frogs Make Good Pets?

On this page, I’ll do my best to answer the question “Do frogs make good pets”. The short answer is “yes” but frogs aren’t for everyone. There are some important details you should consider before getting a frog. I’ll go over the pros and cons on this page and by the end, I hope to send you on your way feeling confident whether or not frogs are a good choice for you.

Amphibians are great pets to display. Watching them jump around a naturalistic setup is enjoyable. However, they’re not great pets for handling. Some species will tolerate occasional holding but, for the most part, frogs (and toads) should be left alone. So, for those of you looking for a pet to hold, you’d be better off getting a reptile. Anyway, keep reading to learn more.

This is why you might not want frogs as pets

There are a few reasons someone might not want frogs for pets. These are the things I’ll be covering in this section.

They’re (mostly) not for handling…

I briefly mentioned this in the opening paragraphs but frogs shouldn’t be held very often (or at all). There are a few of species that will tolerate occasional handling. Even for them, I don’t necessarily recommend doing this because its stressful for the frog and chemicals on your hand could potentially harm your pet.

White's Tree Frog

Amphibians have semi-permeable skin which allows chemicals to pass through. Whatever is on your hands can end up in your pet. So, for those rare species of amphibians that tolerate the occasional handling, you need to clean your hands before picking them up. Or wear a pair of non-powered vinyl gloves.

Nocturnal frogs can be boring during the day

This doesn’t pertain to all species of frogs; only the nocturnal ones. Being nocturnal means they sleep during the day and they’re awake at night. If you’ve got your heart set on a particular type of amphibian, do some research first. Find out whether or not its a nocturnal species.

I have two red-eyed tree frogs in my office but because they’re nocturnal, I rarely see them moving around. I know they’re awake and moving at night but I’m not there to see it. I’m asleep. Sure, you can watch them during the day but they’re not incredibly fascinating while they’re asleep.

Neutral Arguments – “they’re noisy!” Vs “That sound is relaxing”

Originally I was going to put this section in the reasons why you might not want a frog. After giving it some thought, it occurred to me; some people like the sound of frogs croaking. Others, not so much. Which type of person are you?

Also, this topic is largely affected by the type of frog in question. Dumpy tree frogs are loud. Is that something you want to deal with? Not all frogs are noisy, though.

Frogs typically croak during the spring time when its mating season. Since frogs in captivity don’t experience much change in temperate or weather, they might not make a sound. I can’t recall ever hearing my red-eyed tree frogs croaking and I’m positive that one of them is male (male frogs are generally the ones that croak or “call”).

Anyway, this is definitely a topic to research if you think the sound of croaking frogs would bother you. Find out whether or not the species you want is loud.

Reasons frogs make great pets

Now let’s talk about the reasons frogs make great pets. For most, it’s just an enjoyable hobby – regardless of the fact that you can’t hold your beloved amphibians very often.

Fun to observe an exotic species

Perhaps the number one reason people keep frogs as pets is that they’re fun to watch. Especially brightly colored species like poison-dart frogs, red-eyed tree frogs, and reed frogs. There are lots of cool species. Check my post about the world’s weirdest frogs and toads to see what I mean.

Asian Horned Toad

Unfortunately, not all frogs can your pet! Endangered species can’t be kept. Despite that, there are plenty of cool frogs to choose from.

Easy upkeep

Aside from the initial setup, upkeep is simple and easy. All that’s required for most frogs is spot cleaning every other day, misting the enclosure, and feeding. I probably spend less than 20 minutes a week providing upkeep for my tree frogs.

Some circumstances might require changing the substrate in your frog’s terrarium once every two or three months but that all depends on the setup.

Vivarium setups (mini bioactive enclosures) are mostly self-sustaining. Not only that but you can automate misting systems, foggers, and heaters. Misting systems, foggers, and lights can be set on timers and heaters can be attached to a thermostat.

It all depends on what you want to do with your setup and more importantly, what the requirements are for the type of frog you want. Do your research first and plan accordingly!

Frogs + Plants = Pretty Neat

Watching exotic frogs is fun but tropical plants are cool too. They’re a great combination in my opinion. Search for some nice looking, exotic plants that don’t pose a threat to your frog and plant them in your terrarium; I think you’ll find that tropic plants are almost as fun to watch as exotic amphibians.

Tree Frog

You’ll need a few things to make this work, however. Most plants require UVB light and a strict temperature range in order to grow. Fortunately, you can go with plant species that survive and thrive in the type of environment you pet frogs live in.

Conclusion

I’ll wrap things up by saying that frogs make great pets for certain people. They’re great for display and require very little upkeep. Once the initial setup is finished, feeding and spot cleaning their terrarium a few times a week is all that’s required for most frogs.

They eat a variety of foods but live crickets are generally preferred. Crickets are cheap and widely available in pet stores. Also, crickets are fairly easy to raise if you decide.

Frogs aren’t for everyone, though. If you want something to handle frequently, I don’t recommend getting an amphibian. Also, some frogs can be loud at night and that be a downside for certain people.

I truly hope this guide has helped you determine whether or not frogs are a good fit for you. This was a short, simple guide and I didn’t cover everything. Please use the comment section below if you have any questions concerning keeping frogs as pets.

Check out my beginner’s guide to keeping frogs as pets for more related information.

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